Recipes: Steaks of King Salmon

Recipes: Steaks of King Salmon

Catching these amazing salmon fresh in from the sea is one thing; but it’s only half the adventure. The rest takes place in the kitchen when you get back home. Here’s a King Salmon steak recipe every creative home cook should try.

A King Salmon steak brought home from Sitka, Alaska provides a delectable fall afternoon dinner plate. Recipe and photos by Dwayne Parsons

A King Salmon steak brought home from Sitka, Alaska provides a delectable fall afternoon dinner plate. Recipe and photos by Dwayne Parsons


See Also: How to Cook Rockfish

A Recipe for King Salmon Steaks

If you are fortunate to make a King Salmon fishing trip, like the one I enjoyed to Alaska in late August, you’ll likely return home with several pounds of frozen King Salmon steaks, quick frozen for you at the Sitka Processing Plant.

Then, it’s a routine over time of gradually exploring ways to cook them so you don’t have the “same ol’, same ol'” as we say here in America.

I like to cook King steaks in an iron pan in peanut oil, skin down, medium heat. When the steak is partially cooked I put half a cup of water into the oil and place a lid over the still-frying steak. That quickly steams the meat and lifts it from the skin which likely has already somewhat fastened itself to the bottom of the pan. At the same time, I put shreds of ginger root on top of the steak, candied, dried and thinly sliced. On top of that I pour a healthy portion of Cream of Chicken soup stock quite lightly thinned with Almond milk so that it’s a thick sauce and then let it baste until finished.

It’s done when the salmon meat flakes, but I like to watch it closely so that the center of the inch-thick fillet is just rare. It will appear slightly orange-colored than the pink of the more cooked outer flesh. Then I lift the steak off the salmon skin onto my plate. The skin, rich in oil, goes to the happy dog once it’s cooled. Nothing is wasted.

In this case, the steak is garnished with a salad of canned baby beets, and orange bell pepper, sliced in bite-sized cuts both of which are then laid on leaves of fresh lettuce and topped appropriately with Litehouse Foods Blue Cheese (my favorite) and complimented with a slice of banana.

My choice of dressing is appropriate for two reasons: First I love it! And secondly because, I was, after all, fishing with my brother-in-law Doug Hawkins, now retired CEO and past President of Litehouse Foods. I mean really, doesn’t that seem appropriate?

Retired Litehouse Dressings President and Shareholder, Doug Hawkins is thick into the battle with a good Sitka King Salmon.

Retired Litehouse Foods, Inc. President and Shareholder, Doug Hawkins is thick into the battle with a good Sitka King Salmon.


Our third day out found the water a bit more normal than the shirt-sleeve summer weather we had the first two days.

In the photo above, Doug is fighting the King Salmon which below, we laid in the boat.

Twenty-five pounds of fresh King Salmon lying in the bottom of the boat is the first step to a great fall meal.

Twenty-five pounds of fresh King Salmon lying in the bottom of the boat is the first step to a great fall meal.

My Grandfather Haroldson used to make these salmon trips infrequently. Most of my life I held pictures of him in my mind standing dockside with his catch along with the friends with whom he’d fished. Now it’s my turn. Thanks, Gramps, for inspiring me to fish and teaching me some of it. I am forever thankful that I’ve learned not only how to catch fish of all varieties, but how to prepare and cook them as well.

Half the fun is what you get at the table, because the taste adds greatly to both the pleasure and the memory.

See Also: The Sea Lion and Four King Salmon