The Oldest Piano in Existence

I love everything “piano”. So when cruising through my twitter stream, when I came across this tweet by Harold Gray, I just had to look him up and follow. I can only hope its that way with some who find me on occasion through something I’ve written. Nevertheless, this gentleman tweets considerably on all things “piano”. This tidbit is a museum photograph of the oldest piano still in existence. You have to wonder what inspired Bartolomeo Cristofori to build such an instrument.

Born in 1756, Mozart lived until 1791. He could indeed have played this very piano. Whether he did or not, I'll have to learn from the Metropolitan Museum of Art archives.

Born in 1756, Mozart lived until 1791. He could indeed have played this very piano. Whether he did or not, I’ll have to learn from the Metropolitan Museum of Art archives.

The World’s Oldest Piano

Here’s the tweet that caught my eye.

A Twitter Experience

On Twitter, if you click on a photo icon in the stream, your action brings up a singular image that allows you to do something with it. You can “favorite” it or “retweet” or “embed” the tweet as I did here.

Embedding means that Twitter, which owns the Tweet, has allowed it to be reproduced on another website or blog. It’s smart thinking because it spreads the original giving credit to its source.

So when I clicked on the image, I found that it came from The Mozart Project. But the original tweet gave @metmuseum. The people or person behind The Mozart Project are giving credit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for their source of the information and the photo.

I like that because now, thanks to search engines I can follow @metmuseum on Twitter to learn more about who they are and their relationship to this incredibly old instrument. I can also google or bing for The Mozart Project to find out who they are and glean more information from them.

Not only do I now have a potential friend in Harold Gray, I can reach by following any and all followers of his, of The Mozart Project and of MetMuseum. So as easily as that, my horizon of piano acquaintances and my knowledge of piano and piano music and composers has increased considerably.

As it turns out, The Mozart Project is the first interactive digital book for iPad and the subject is Mozart. What an incredibly fortunate find! And yes, @metmuseum is the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; tweets by Taylor Newby (@taylorcnewby) and Lucy Redoglia (@MetEveryday).

Thanks, Harold Gray, for bringing value to the Twitter Table.