Official: Veterans Diamond Cup 2014

The Veterans Diamond Cup hydroplane race on Coeur d/Alene Lake is a carry-over of a strong tradition of the 1950s and '60s. As part of the circuit, it's recognized as far away as Qatar.  File photo, Diamond Cup promoters.

The Veterans Diamond Cup hydroplane race on Coeur d/Alene Lake is a carry-over of a strong tradition of the 1950s and ’60s. As part of the circuit, it’s recognized as far away as Qatar.
File photo, Diamond Cup promoters.

Welcome to the Veterans Diamond Cup 2014 Hydroplane Race

This year’s Lake Coeur d’Alene hydroplane races are officially tagged the 2014 Veterans Diamond Cup.
Doug Miller, President of The Diamond Cup Unlimited LLC, made the announcement official in a media release this morning.

The idea was introduced by local businessman, Dennis Muoio, of Redstone Logistics and brought forward by Alan Golub and Dwayne Parsons to honor US and Canadian military personnel and their families.

The Labor Day Weekend event, August 29-31, runs 5 classes of hydroplanes including the fastest boats in the world.

Three of the 5 boat classes are racing for national points. The races, which will stream live over the internet, will be seen in at least 110 countries this year.

The Mission

The Mission Statement for Coeur d’Alene’s race event is “To provide families and hydroplane race fans an exciting, safe, and memorable racing event while generating significant economic impacts for the community, the company and our employees.”

Last year’s event drew an estimated 55,000 visitors. It filled hotels and restaurants from Spokane to Sandpoint and Wallace. The estimated economic boost to North Idaho and eastern Washington communities is between $2 and $3 million dollars.

Muoio said the idea came to him in the face of all the bad rap Veterans of all wars have had in the media of late. “Veterans, Active Duty personnel, and their families, deserve our heartfelt gratitude in preserving our freedoms. I hope this promotion in part is a way of lifting them up into the spotlight and saying thank you for their sacrifices, and at the same time to honor them,” he said. “They earned it.”

Miller said the Hydromaniacs, a 501c3 non-profit organization that traditionally promoted hydroplane racing on Lake Coeur d’Alene, will manage revenue from block ticket sales to corporate and individual sponsors who want to honor the veterans and their families with free attendance.

Who does it?

From 3 to 5 local veterans groups will participate in selling and distributing tickets to veterans and their families, including those who’ve lost loved ones in service.

Tickets run from $29 for one-day to $55 per person for 3 days. Tickets purchased in blocks by individual and corporate interests will be distributed through local veterans groups.

It's a full-family event too and to make it special this year is being run specifically to honor Veterans of all wars and their families, both American and Canadian.

It’s a full-family event too and to make it special this year is being run specifically to honor Veterans of all wars and their families, both American and Canadian.


Revenues raised from the sale of these tickets will be held in escrow by the Hydromaniacs for proper distribution to the race promoters at the time of the event, according to John Tietz, spokesperson for the Hydromaniacs.

The Diamond Cup was revived last year after a 46-year hiatus from Lake Coeur d’Alene hydroplane racing that ran yearly for nearly two decades in the 50’s and 60’s.

“I still remember the excitement those races generated in my high school days,” said Parsons, a Sandpoint resident. “It’s more than a spectacle; it drives community spirit.”

“Watching boats approach or exceed 200 miles per hour is not only thrilling,” Golub, a resident of Hayden added, “the event stirs to the vision and dreams of our younger generations to explore technology and innovation.”